SmartThings

Backup Internet for my Alexa and Particle.io Devices

I’m really enjoying using Alexa to control the lights in my home. One down side to this however is the requirement to be connected to the internet. Without an internet connection Alexa becomes a lazy idiot.

SmartThings, TPLink Nano, and iPhone

Since I live in an RV, I won’t always have a fast internet connection. So what I’ve done to deal with that is to have two separate hot spots, only one of which is ever active at any given time.

When my fast internet (was Roadrunner, will soon be Google fiber) is available and working, it transmits to all my devices.

When I’m on the road, or the fast internet breaks (like for the past 5 days!), I plug in a TPLink Nano Wireless N router. This little $35 box is very versatile, and can handle receiving and/or transmitting on Wifi and/or ethernet.

For example, as shown in the image, the SmartThings hub needs an ethernet connection. So the Nano is configured as a “Client”, to receive WiFi from the iPhone and convert it to an Ethernet connection for the hub.

Likewise, with the Nano connected to my normal WiFi router, I can configure the Nano to receive WiFi at whatever RV Park I happen to be staying, and distribute it to all my WiFi and IoT devices without having to reconfigure anything except the Nano.

SmartThings Control of Photon Devices Using Patriot

SmartThings

So having finally received my SmartThings hub and a few devices, I’ve spent the past week learning how to program it to interface with my existing Particle.io Photon controllers running Patriot. It turns out that SmartThings has a fairly nice architecture that made automatically discovering my existing devices fairly easy. I needed to write a Service Manager SmartApp and a child Device Handler. Altogether this was about 200 lines of Groovy code (basically Java). The service manage interacts with Particle.io to locate each Photon controller on my account, and then ask it what devices it supports. It then creates a child device for each using the name exposed by the Photon. Voila!

This is essentially the same approach used by the Patriot Alexa Smart Home controller that I published for Alexa.

So yesterday when I finally got the kinks worked out, I reinstalled the Patriot Service Manager SmartApp that I’d written, and it automatically discovered my two dozen Patriot lights and added them to SmartThings. Woohoo!

So now I just need to explore the Alexa implementation on SmartThings and see if my Alexa Smart Home skill is still needed. At this point it looks like it can be completely replaced by the SmartThings Alexa support.

Switching to Samsung SmartThings

After a frustrating few weeks of unsuccessfully trying to get Home Assistant working with my Patriot Particle.io devices and Z-Wave bulbs, I’ve decided to switch directions and won’t be investing any more time on Home Assistant. While I really appreciate all the hard work that folks have put into Home Assistant, it just isn’t a good fit me.

So I am switching gears and am investigating integrating Patriot with the Samsung SmartThings hub instead. This will give me both Z-Wave and Zigbee control, and some level of operation when disconnected from the internet.

I’ve read through much of the SmartThings developer documentation, which is very good. I like the architecture, and clear descriptions of how to integrate 3rd party hardware.

I ordered a SmartThings Monitoring Kit from Amazon that should be here tomorrow in time to have some of my Holiday time off to play with it. This kit includes the SmartThings hub, a couple door sensors (with vibration and temperature sensing), an a/c switched outlet, and a motion sensor.

In searching the developer forums I’ve located some posts by others that have been successful in integrating SmartThings with the Particle.io cloud, so I’m confident that in no time I’ll have it controlling the plethora of lights, fans, and awnings that I currently control using Particle.io Photons and Patriot.